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Recruitment Services

Vacancies

Australian trained and registered doctors are welcome to apply for all advertised vacancies on this website.

It is a legislative requirement that overseas trained doctors can only work in locations that have been classified as District of Workforce Shortage (DWS). Not all of the vacancies listed here have this classification but Rural Health West will help you find an eligible position.

For more information please refer to the Australian Government Department of Health factsheet or if you have a specific location in mind, see the locator map and select Districts of Workforce Shortage layer.

Goldfields

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Goldfields

The Eastern Goldfields is the largest region in WA. It covers almost one third of Western Australia and has a population of about 54,000. More than half of the region’s residents live in Kalgoorlie-Boulder.

Esperance, on the southern coast, is the second largest centre with a population of around 13,000.

The Kalgoorlie region has been historically significant in the development of the Western Australia, as the centre of the gold rush in the 1890s. As well as reminders of those times in the buildings and institutions around the city, there is still a plethora of natural bounty to be enjoyed in its eucalyptus forests, wide sweeping plains and abundance of wildlife. The cultural mix found in the region is also rich, with a melding of Indigenous and European heritages that has created an area of unique character. To the southern edge of the region the pristine beaches provide a stunning backdrop to Australia’s southern ocean, reached through a corridor of National Parks and wide swathes of unspoiled natural beauty.

The primary industries in the cooler southern part of the region are fishing and farming. The warm, dry northern areas are dominated by gold and nickel mining and industry-related services.

About 50 GPs work in the region across 22 practices, including Aboriginal Medical Services and the Royal Flying Doctor Service. Kalgoorlie is well serviced by specialists.

Map showing Central Wheatbelt
  • Key facts
    • Population 54000
    • Distance from Perth 600km
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Great Southern

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Great Southern

The Great Southern region, located south-east of Perth, covers an area of approximately 87, 000 square kilometres and has a population of about 80,000 people.

The regional centre is the historic port town of Albany, which has one of the best natural anchorages in the southern hemisphere. Other centres include Denmark, a popular coastal holiday town, as well as the agricultural centres of Katanning and Mount Barker. The Great Southern is a burgeoning area of Western Australia, combining as it does a spectacular coastline that sweeps into quiet coves and protected inlets with a lush interior that has proved a perfect growth area for viticulture with a growing reputation in cool climate premium wine production. The oceans here provide food and protected waters for dolphins, seals and whales whilst the rural areas of the region have become a focus for two-legged lovers of gourmet foods.

There are over 70 doctors working across 24 practices throughout the region. Nine of these are sole practitioner practices.

Map showing Central Wheatbelt
  • Key facts
    • Population 80000
    • Distance from Perth 400km
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Indian Ocean Territories

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Indian Ocean Territories

Christmas Island

Christmas Island is a dot in the Indian Ocean 2,600 km north west of Perth. The cultural background is diverse, settlers having come from Malaysian, Chinese, Indonesian and European backgrounds. The society works as a harmonious blend of cultures, accepting and inclusive of each other’s beliefs and practices.

The island is the peak of a submarine mountain, its 80 km coastline of mostly sheer cliff broken by occasional small bays or inlets. 63% of the island is comprised national park, populated by many species unique to the island.

Cocos Island

This tiny horseshoe shaped island is 2750klm north-west of Perth and 900km west south-west of Christmas Island. Cocos Island also represents a melding of the cultural backgrounds of the settlers arriving on the island from all points of the globe. However, the culture and religion practiced here now is predominantly Muslim and the prevalent language a dialect of Malaysian called Cocos-Malay.

The island comprises two coral atolls and is home to a stunning diversity of bird and marine life.

The climate in this region is equatorial, with temperatures reaching a maximum of around 28 year round, but high rainfall in the wet season of December to April and prone to occasional cyclonic activity

Map showing Central Wheatbelt
  • Key facts
    • Population 0
    • Distance from Perth 2600km
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Inner Regional

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Inner Regional

Inner regional towns are those which are designated as Remoteness Area two (RA2) under the Australian Standard Geographical Classification – Remoteness Areas system (ASGC-RA). These towns are located approximately 50-100km from the Perth centre, in North, South or East locations. 

Towns in these areas are generally semi-rural, with larger properties available, and agricultural industries still operating. Most are thriving communities that attract day trippers, due to their close proximity to Perth and many are developing flourishing tourism industries, such as wine and food, to attract visitors. Populations in these towns can range from smaller communities of around 2,000 people to larger centres of 5,500 people.

Map showing Central Wheatbelt
  • Key facts
    • Population 3000
    • Distance from Perth 100km
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Kimberley

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Kimberley

The Kimberley is located in the North West region of Western Australia. It covers an area of 421,451 square kilometres, an area three times the size of England, but is home to only 35,748 people. A relatively high proportion of the residents are Aboriginal Australians. The population swells seasonally with an influx of tourists and a mobile working population.

The major towns of the Kimberley include Broome and Derby on the west coast, with Kununurra and Wyndham in the east. Within this vast landscape there is a huge diversity of scenery to be explored and adventures to be experienced. Broome enjoys a laid-back tropical ambience whilst the ranges of the East Kimberley showcase the awe-inspiring grandeur and beauty that nature has created. Venturing into this land imparts a unique sense of connection with an ancient and unspoiled part of Australia. Travels across the Kimberley will yield tropical beaches, rugged ranges, spectacular gorges, waterfalls, caves, pockets of lush rainforest and an astounding variety of wildlife.

The region has a thriving economy, based on both tourism and the richness of its natural resources. It enjoys regular commercial flights from Perth and interstate capital cities. The Kimberley has a tropical summer and dry winter and this diverse climate changes the landscape from season to season.

There are approximately 70 general practitioners including GP registrars in the region, nine in private practice, 33 in Aboriginal Medical Services, two in the Royal Flying Doctor Service and 26 hospital based general practitioners.

Map showing Central Wheatbelt
  • Key facts
    • Population 35748
    • Distance from Perth 2000km
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Midwest

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Midwest

Covering an area of some 470,000 square kilometres, the Midwest region extends from the outback to the ocean. The economic base for the region centres on mining, agriculture, fishing and tourism. Attractions include internationally recognised windsurfing beaches, wildflowers and a rich maritime history of mutiny and shipwrecks.

The region has a population of more than 50,000 people. More than half is based in the City of Geraldton, the region’s commercial, administrative and service centre, around four hours drive north of Perth.

The coastal part of the region enjoys a Mediterranean climate, while the inland experiences warm, dry summers and cool winters.

There are approximately 80 doctors in the region, including private GPs, specialists and doctors employed by the hospital and the Aboriginal Medical Service.

Map showing Central Wheatbelt
  • Key facts
    • Population 50000
    • Distance from Perth 1000km
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Pilbara

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Pilbara

The Pilbara is located about 1600 kms north of Perth, in the North West region of Western Australia, with an area of around 500,000 square kilometres and a population of approximately 40,000 people. The primary towns are Karratha and Port Hedland on the coast, and Tom Price and Newman inland.

An area of rugged beauty, the Pilbara has a vast coastal plain, spectacular inland ranges and an arid desert region reaching into the centre of Australia. It is characterised by the rich red hues of its landscape, imparted by the abundance of natural riches in its reserves of iron ore. Mining and offshore oil and gas exploration have given rise to the Pilbara’s economic boom in recent years, drawing large numbers of people to the region on both a temporary and permanent basis.

It has a tropical, semi-desert climate with a mainly summer rainfall associated with thunderstorms. From October to April temperatures throughout the region generally exceed 32 degrees c every day, sometimes topping 40 degrees, particularly in inland areas.

There are approximately 46 doctors working in the region in various areas, including General Practices, Aboriginal Medical Services, hospitals and the Royal Flying Doctor Service. 

Map showing Central Wheatbelt
  • Key facts
    • Population 40000
    • Distance from Perth 1600km
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Southwest

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Southwest

The Southwest region of Western Australia offers great diversity, with beautiful coastal environments adjacent to ancient forests.

The Southwest region includes the major City’s of Mandurah (population 67,000), Bunbury (population 60,000) and Busselton (population 31,000), with other towns including Collie, Manjimup, Harvey, Bridgetown and the well-known wine-growing centre of Margaret River.

The region is well-serviced by doctors and specialists and includes the major health centres in Mandurah (Peel Health Campus) and Bunbury (South West Health Campus).

The Southwest is popular as a holiday destination with coastal town populations swelling over the summer holiday periods and the inland areas being popular camping and adventure activity destinations.

Map showing Central Wheatbelt
  • Key facts
    • Population 90000
    • Distance from Perth 200km
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Wheatbelt

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Wheatbelt

The Central Wheatbelt area covers an area of approximately 85,000 sq km. The population is widely dispersed across the region, with major service centres at Narrogin, Northam, Merredin and Moora, with an economy based largely on agriculture.

It is a charming region of small farming communities dotted over a landscape of wheat fields and sheep pasture. The environment of the Wheatbelt is quite varied. The Avon region close to Perth is known for its lush environment, thanks to its relatively high rainfall. The coastal region supports fishing and aquaculture, while the warm, dry inland areas are suited to agricultural industries such as wheat and sheep farming.

The region has extensive educational, health, recreational and cultural services and is home to the C Y O'Connor College of TAFE and Curtin University's Muresk Institute of Agriculture. The region also offers affordable housing and business premises.

More than 40 doctors work in the region, mostly in private practice.

Map showing Central Wheatbelt
  • Key facts
    • Population 60000
    • Distance from Perth 100km
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